By

Artist: Ruede Hagelstein7436_soft-pack-remixes
Title: Soft Pack Remixes
Label: Souvenir Music, DE.
Cat. #: SOUVENIR045
Format: 12″/Digital
Release Date: 07.05.12
Tracklist:
01. Berlin (Mathias Kadens A9 remix)
02. Private (Chris Wood & Meat Ladyboy remix)
03. Berlin
04. Berlin (Emerson Todd remix) DIGITAL only
05. Posteriori (Less & Moses Remix) DIGITAL only
06. Good Night (Gunne Remix) DIGITAL only

Souvenir presents Ruede Hagelstein’s second single release ‘Berlin’ off last year’s debut album ‘Soft Pack’ alongside his band The Noblettes.
Last time round it was ‘A Priori’ with a bunch of remixes, and here ‘Berlin’ is featured in its original version as well as with lots of digital only goodies. Mathias Kaden, much-loved around the city as a member of both the Vakant and Freude Am Tanzen families, supplies the A-side treatment. He warps out the original’s sunset melody, into a swirling, psychedelic bassline more fitting to a an afterhours sunrise, the once-jubilant vocals processed down into a careless whisper. Frankfurt dons Chris Wood & Meat, subtly crank up the tempo on ‘Private’ retaining its warped strings, but underpinned by a driving drum pattern, the diva-esque spoken vocals are stretched over it all like the tight skin drawn over a snare. Finally, the joyous, open-air anthem that is the original, lightens things up, that particular excitement felt by Berlin residents on returning home perfectly described by its gentle plucked melody and soothing saxophone.
Digitally, there’s three fantastic extra remixes, Emerson Todd chopping up ‘Berlin’ into a wonky, peak-time monster, the chorus barely recognizable as a mere double-tap to the kick. Less & Moses cook up a very special treat for ‘A Posteriori’, throwing all the constituent parts into a solid pot of galvanized steel, swirling synth sweeps and a dubbed out bassline bubbles away until exploding into the beautiful vocal refrain of the original. A rain of rhodes chords signals the stew’s reached a turning point, Orbital-esque fills applying emotive seasoning until the track finishes out on the same crowd samples as it began. Gunne does a Mathew Herbert on ‘Good Night’, upturning the original’s cabaret vocals onto a tribal, uptempo groove, with guitars and a throbbing bassline. Aileen Phönex’s sultry lyrics turn from melancholy to predatory, as she sweeps across the dancefloor, seeking the pleasures of the love rather than yearning for things lost.

 

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